Hello! Thanks for visiting my blog.

I am on a blogging hiatus as I would like to focus on my jewelry craft work. Hence, I will not be taking in requests for reviews of any nature in the future. If you do have queries on my jewelry work instead, please get in touch via email : oon.adeline@gmail.com

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

[Blog Train] Making Good - Replacing A Broken Clasp on Necklace or Bracelet

It could be a new necklace you just bought or a favorite versatile piece that you've been wearing for the longest time. Then the inevitable happens! The spring clasp break and you aren't sure whether to chuck it (that would be such a waste!) or where to find help to get it fixed.


As far as I am aware, most bead supply shops in Singapore do not cater to helping you fix such dilemmas. Approaching a professional at a retail shop may set you up between S$10-S$20 for this service. As for me, truth be told, when my clients approach me to fix a straightforward broken jewelry like this, there will also be minimal charges to cover workmanship, materials, postage and packaging which would be between $4-$6. This of course, also excludes the (hassle) to and fro mailing plus the waiting time.

So with just a little investment on your end, I hope this post will help you make good your own broken jewelry without the need to part with so much cash just to get a broken clasp replaced. Here's a quick list of what you will need :

Lobster clasp or spring clasp
You can buy a small quantity of this at any bead supply shop. A small packet would usually consist of 4-6 pieces which should cost you no more than 40 cents a piece. They come in various sizes and shapes too! Get one that you are comfortable with handling.

Jump rings
These round little loops are required for connecting parts together, in this case, the new clasp. A small packet would usually have at least a dozen pieces which should cost you no more than 10 cents a piece. They come in various gauge (thickness of wire) and sizes. Ask the staff at the bead shop to help you select the appropriate one. Or better yet, ask them to help pick out the components you need to get your item fixed.

Pliers
To help with the opening and closure of the jump rings. I don't suggest you buy them but if you do, a mini set would cost you no more than $9.  A standard set will comprise of a flat nose pliers, sharp nose pliers (both shown in the photo below) and a cutter. Or look around your dad's or hubby's tool box for something similar because you basically just need them to help open and close the jump rings. Alternatively, you can also try using tweezers.


*Please note that the above pricing of components are in Singapore dollars and serves as a guide.*

Here's a little video tutorial I took using my mobile phone, of how a broken clasp is replaced. Or if the existing jump ring holding the broken clasp is not damaged, you can recycle it.


Just a couple more tips to note :

- in the video, do observe the proper way of opening up the jump rings. Using both pliers, twist one side open toward you and the other away from you. There's no need to open up too wide lest it gets distorted. Do the same when closing the ring till the ends meet. It is wrong to open jump rings apart by pulling the ends away in a left and right motion as it will cause more distortion and may result in breakage.

- using the same method in the video, you can also do the same for replacing extension chains in your accessories, connect broken chains or even earrings.

Do you have any questions for me regarding this post? Let me know and I'll be most happy to help!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I hope you are having fun checking out all the other bloggers that are on this blog train so far too!
Did you manage to check out Stella's make good post about fixing a shoulder strap bag with yarn? Read about how she went about perfecting it at Purfylle.com 

I'm also excited to introduce the next blogger, Nueyer, on board tomorrow's train!

 http://angelheartscrafts.blogspot.com/Nueyer is from sunny Singapore and started crafting/sewing from young.  As school and work commitments came along, the crafting got less and less until it disappeared.  However, when there was a need to sew an odd-sized pillow case for Big One, the crafting bug came alive!  Now, I can't stop crafting and hope that one day, I'll be able to make some change to this world, no matter how small. 
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Till the next post, have a wonderful day!


This post is part of a blog train hosted by Agatha from Green Issues by Agy on "Making Good". What is repair, and why do we even bother to repair the things we have? Some see repair as a way of reconnecting with our possessions as we extend their lives. Others see it as a form of creative potential and an avenue to express their craft. The rewards for mending varies from feeling immense satisfaction to prolonging the life of the product. Follow the “Making Good” blog train this month and see what we have repaired and reconnected with. 

Have you mended anything today?

14 comments:

  1. I get really annoyed when that happens to the lobster clasp! This is a great fix for anybody who wears jewelry. And great video, btw.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for hosting this Agatha! I wouldn't have done a tutorial otherwise. :)

      Delete
  2. Such a pet peeve when this happens! Great repair and I love that you did a video to show exactly how its done! Great making good!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, isn't it such a pet peeve! :p I hope I have helped zillions overcome this and know what to do next time. :p

      Delete
  3. That's so frustrating when a clasp breaks! :) Lisa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is! And thank goodness we all know what to do now. :)

      Delete
  4. What a super way to save some money!! I have paid to have a jewelry clasp repaired, and now I could kick myself for not trying it myself. Thanks for sharing this Adeline. Nice video too! Thumbs up! Brandi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops! Well, there's always a first, Brandi. :) Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  5. Oh you make the repair look, well not easy but definitely doable! I will feel comfy fixing my own lobsters (ha!) in the future :) thanks for taking the time to show us how this is done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Definitely doable! Glad the tutorial helps.

      Delete
  6. I've always called them parrot clasps. Funny how many names something can get isn't it? I've done this myself with and without the correct tools and having the right pliers really makes a big difference to how beautiful a finish you get.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really, Stella? I haven't heard the term parrot clasp before but come to think of it, yeah it does pass off as a perched parrot!

      Delete
  7. This has happened to me more times then I'd care to remember. I didn't know there was a certain way to pull it apart, but your video really helped clear that up. This was so helpful, thanks!

    Carrie
    curlycraftymom.com
    Joining the blog train May 14!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy to know that you learned something new, Carrie! Thanks for dropping by!

      Delete

I love comments on my post and thank you in advance for responding! All comments will be moderated before publishing just so that the spammers don't get in the way.

AddThis

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...